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    Bianchi MT 61 army motorcycle

    Modern army motorcycles are usually somewhat lower compressed, not too heavy all roads in a green jacket. They are even available in a diesel version. The motorcycles during WWII were usually very recognizable civilians on 'our' side who were called into arms. Quite often they were single-cylinder four-stroke side valves, because that approach combined reliability with simplicity. On the German side, the designers often got carried away by their 'lead through technology' genes. That led to impressive and complicated machines like the BMW R75 and so on. And as it turned out: you don't win war with that. Sea

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    Triumph Trophy TR25W. BSA's revenge

    The concept of the adventure motorcycle was far from conceived in the late XNUMXs. So if you wanted to play in the sand with a motorcycle, you had to choose from the 'Scramblers' on sale at the time, like something from Honda's CL range. These really weren't serious off roaders, but street machines with a high exhaust and a cross handlebar. Sea

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    BSA Spitfire. Fast, unreliable and sought after

    The BSA Spitfire was the fastest BSA motorcycle and was produced from 1966 to 1968 with MkII, MkIII and MkIV model designations. Announced at the Brighton Motorcycle Show in September 1965, the dynamic novice was based on the earlier BSA Lightning with a power upgrade achieved through the most classic tuning. Sea

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    BSA Sunbeam and Triumph Tigress. A grumpy kitten

    Scooters were conceived as gender-neutral means of mass transport. Many Italian advertisements therefore featured beautiful young ladies. But there were also members of the standing-urinating kind who were scooterists. Rob Bakker and his fiancé, for example, went to Spain on a scooter. Sea

  • army motorcycles
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    Army motorcycles. 75 years after WWII

    The Second World War is over 75 years. But is still 'alive'. Never before has so much been done on re-enactment as now. And whether that is a tribute or just playing a soldier? Pretending is taken quite a bit. Because a lot of army motorcycles that have to pass for German sidecar combinations? Those are just pimped […] Sea

  • addresses
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    Addresses. Thanks to Gerrit

    We recently placed a call to report 'addresses'. Addresses where there are still people who do not supply cheap Chinese imitation choke faucets (watch out: they break) or exhaust bend sets (they don't fit). Addresses where they just 'still have stuff' and know what they have. And how important they can be? Recently - very recently - I had a […] Sea

  • BSA A65
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    BSA A65. A nice machine, a bad start

    I had a Triumph T150, was a member of TOCN, was dating the smartest and most beautiful girl I had ever seen. And I bought a beautiful BSA A65 with a tear in the buddyseat cover. I paid 1.800 guilders for that. At Muts in Soest I bought a ZGAN buddy for 40 guilders. […] Sea

  • BSA B33
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    BSA B33. Scraping or getting rid of?

    The knees of the waving generation of owners is often still a thing. Because to start a British 500 cc single-cylinder, you need pedaling power. And the fat one-pits - and many more beautiful things - have been cherished within a limited circle for years. They have grown older along with their owners. But […] Sea

  • BSA B33
    in

    The BSA B33 and the knees

    A BSA B33 is the example. But the story then turns to the knees of the waving generation of owners of B33s and similar motorcycles. Because to start a British 500 cc single cylinder, you need quite a bit of pedaling power. The thick one-pitters - and many more beautiful things - have been kept within limited […] Sea

  • BSA
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    A BSA 65 Lightning

    I was in my early twenties, a member of the TOCN, had one Triumph T150V, was madly in love with a smart and beautiful young lady and bought an almost as beautiful BSA A65 Lightning for 1850 guilders. The gathering of years went on as usual, the membership of the TOCN disappeared. Contacts with a […] Sea

  • BSA B33
    in

    Back from the past: The BSA B33

    The thick BSA one-pits and their competitors from other brands are back on the market. And that while they were untraceable for years because they were fairly divided among enthusiasts. There is an explanation for this return of the predecessors of the XT500: The BSA and the knees The knees of the farewell generation of owners. Because […] Sea

  • BSA
    in

    BSA stuff goes home. And there is a book

    While visiting fellow villager Gekra Motoren I met two friendly Brits, Lee, a specialist in former military BSA B40s, and Dave from Ratio Rebuilds, a company that makes BSA single-cylinder engines like new again. Friendly British Gekra has traditionally been a trade in 'dump motorcycles', or as it sounds more friendly: 'Army surplus motorcycles'. And […] Sea

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