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Powder coating and blasting

Dear Classic Lover

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We were on a job with a very friendly technology enthusiast and saw a track bike with a striking silver frame color. The paint had a hard, smooth and deep gloss. Our host Bart Verstijnen turned out to be the man behind Custom Coatings Helvoirt and he turned out to be able to talk about his work just as passionately as about the subject we actually came up with: powder coating.


So powder coating

“I powder coated that. Because with powder coating I pay for my groceries and my hobby. " And that's how you come to powder coating.

Everything used to be different

We also used to have powder coated. This happened with industrial powder coaters who usually made a living due to the fact that a powder coat coat offered about the best conceivable protection. And that for eternity plus two weeks.
The problem then was that the coaters usually only had a few colors available. And that the things they blasted and coated were often as subtle as bridge railings and large gas tanks. When blasting those things, it only mattered that the surface became white. The grain sizes and the blasting pressure were used with certainty.

Our things weren't rude enough

Our things were usually the things that went with the crowd without a receipt. You often did not know exactly when or whether you would get them back. And you shouldn't be too disappointed if a tank or a door was 'blown in' or blown out.

Many abrasives are unsuitable for our stuff

Such as there are: (steel) grit, soil, soda, steel, glass or ice. The old stuff has to be clean. And blasting cleans in a purely mechanical way. The old paintwork and rust are simply removed. Various abrasives can be used, each with its own properties. But what you do not want in any case is that jet residues remain in the interior of an engine block. Because that's how we once heard a revised Honda CBX six-cylinder block change into a block that needed to be revised in three minutes.

Prefer not to blast grit

Blasting grit is an aggressive metallic abrasive (high carbon). It can be used in a shot blasting machine, blast hall and blast cabinet on plate, profile and structural steel.
Steelshot HC (High Carbon) is a round metallic abrasive that is mainly used in throw blasting installations and blast halls.
Steelshot LC (Low Carbon) is a round metallic abrasive. It is mainly used in throwing blast installations and blast halls.
Durablast is a metallic abrasive. Durablast is produced by cutting spring steel to the desired grain length.
Ferblast / cast iron grit is a high quality angled cast iron grit.
And then there are also stainless steel shot Amacast, white corundum, silicon carbide and quite a lot more.

Glass and nutshells

Glass bead is a non-metallic abrasive. It is frequently used to clean, polish, mattify stainless steel and aluminum and to reduce the roughness of the surface. Handy stuff for classic fans. Also nice: Ceramic pearls is a non-metallic abrasive. Ceramic pearls are also used to give a nice finish to stainless steel surfaces. Plastic granulate is a plastic blasting medium for the stripping of surfaces. Due to the sharp-edged surfaces, a product can be cleaned, stripped or stripped of sharp edges in a careful manner. And then there are ground nut shells (also called walnut granulate), dried, degreased and classified.

Bart is also not fond of soda blasting. Because soda is a salt. And salt plus water is brine. Bart shines with a kind of stones that are shoveled off a beach somewhere. They break into powder on hard impact. We will take a serious look at the sand on our favorite IJssel beach.

Powder coating in all colors

After all that specialist blasting, coating is actually the easiest. And besides the few standard colors of the past, a whole rainbow range of colors with a very nice gloss coverage is now available. And that is great for Bart, because he does a lot in the chopper and custom corner. But fortunately he still thinks solid black is a great color.

Read also:
- Powder coating? You can do that yourself!
- Dinitrol anti-rust treatment. Rust does not rest
- Fiberglass-reinforced polyester
- Tinkering for beginners
- Panacea in the engine oil: PTFE and zinc


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