cover 9-2020

What you can read in the new AMK is shown below. Every month plenty of pages filled with everything about classic cars and motorcycles, sometimes even a single truck. Auto Motor Klassiek is now in the shops, in the Netherlands and Belgium.

New in the store in the Netherlands and Belgium every month. And a few days earlier with the subscribers. Subscribe is a lot cheaper, you pay 40% less than in the store.

BMW Z1

BMW Z1 in a completely unique color combination

With a BMW Z1 you already place yourself in the spotlight, but according to some it can be even more crazy. What about this deep blue with a fire red interior? Then you get a Superman combination and exactly that nickname he has been wearing since his show (room) position at the Dutch importer. Oh yes, he is one of a kind.

Kawasaki 500 cc Mach lll H-1

Kawasaki three-cylinder

Kawasaki three-cylinder from the seventies are a popular place for two-stroke enthusiasts. The vicious powerhouses were the fastest motorcycles in their class. The 'widow-makers' asked for respect because of their toxic wealth development. Nol Bikker has them all and much more. His favorite is a blue 500 cc Mach lll H-1.

Triumph Spitfire

Triumph Spitfire purchase advice

The charm of the classic British roadster goes without saying, with the note, however, that you often have to pay a lot of attention for it. The pleasant exceptions include the Triumph Spitfire, beautiful in line, pure in design and simply conceived. Make sure you don't come home with a cheap patched up one.

cable harnesses from Beek Classic Wire

Safe, authentically executed cable harnesses from Beek Classic Wire

Some classics are haunted, with a malfunction in the almost inscrutable network of wires, plugs, relays and fuses. “A neglected child, the cable harness,” says Patrick Beek, who dives into this abacadabra every day within his company Beek Classic Wire. "People don't know what to do with it or they overestimate their own understanding."

Honda GL500D Silver Wing

Honda GL500D Silver Wing

We received a message from Henk Kooken from Deventer: “The Honda Silver Wing GL500D in the picture has been in my possession since March 2, 2009. The special thing is that the full history is known. ” So we went to visit Henk.

Chevrolet Chevelle after restoration

Chevrolet Chevelle restoration report

This 396 Chevrolet Chevelle SS1970 hasn't been on the road for seven years. But he has been reborn. Like New. Or rather: better than new. Because Robin Houtman has tackled and improved the car to perfection.

Ford F3 Hot Rod

Rare Ford F3 trucks in a wonderful setting

Peter de Jong has had a preference for rare classics for years. He has had a Nissan Pao for several years. And in the autumn of 2019, he found a Ford F3 through Harm de Roos of Lilypad Speedshop in Gorredijk. That seems like a less exotic choice. But Peter's F3 is one of a very rare series, which was built around 1950 at the special request of the Belgian army. The Ford is the reason for a report about the F3 itself. And in Gorredijk also a bonus awaits, and that is a nice glimpse into the world of customizing and Hot Rod construction.

On the way for the liberation

On the way for the liberation

A gigantic loot-of-pictures offered at least one Banana box almost stuffed with the most special photos ever collected by someone. That collector might have wanted to experience it all, some 75 years after the liberation. Unfortunately, he is no longer there, we are and can enjoy his passion for collecting. That should be the case now, because despite the new Corona rules being made more flexible, organizing commemorations is almost as dangerous as in the years when the deployed Allies pushed our Eastern neighbors back to their own territory. Fortunately, on the back of most photos is written in pencil where and when the recordings took place. If not, we owe you that information ... Because some black and white photos were also found in the collection that give an impression during the occupation in the Netherlands, we also serve them up.

news 9-2020

Short messages

Auto Motor Klassiek has plenty to report every month, current news, useful tips, events, you name it. Including monthly columns the column by Maria Pels, Erik van Putten, Jouke Bloem and Mark van Beeck.

Classic Post 9-2020

Reader post

Every month, our readers' section is full of reactions from readers, discoveries they made on (distant) journeys, or corrections to previously asked questions.

Classics 9-2020

Vintage cars for sale

Vintage cars for sale, Young timers for sale, Classic engines for sale. You will find every month in Auto Motor Klassiek thousands again classics for sale.

Preface

When a jam-smeared sandwich falls to the floor, it always falls with the jam side down. Unless you're just trying to prove it. I think that is still the best definition of Murphy's Law. If something can go wrong, it will go wrong. Unless you want to, but then wrong is of course good. Murphy's law is a special law. Often not only the inventor of all important laws of nature is known, but there are also funny anecdotes around it. Faraday's law of induction, for example, is named after British physicist and chemist Michael Faraday. And the funny anecdote is well known. When British Prime Minister Gladstone met Michael Faraday in his day, he asked him if his fumbling with electricity would ever be of any practical use. To which Faraday replied with a straight face, "Yes, one day you can tax it."

And then of course we have old Newton who - funny anecdote - got an apple on his head while he was sitting in the garden. Where a normal person would curse, he came to his law of gravity. In his view, the force that dropped the apple straight to Earth would be the same force that keeps planets in orbit.

But where Faraday and Newton, including accompanying anecdotes, are almost as well known as the Kardashians, no one knows who Murphy is and the hilarious anecdote that underlies this natural law. It shows how powerful and universal Murphy's law is: even in the attribution and recording of the anecdote that led to Murphy's law, everything went wrong. Just creepy….

When tinkering with classic cars and motorcycles, you often have to deal with Murphy, even if you don't know. Ever removed a lock from the camshaft chain? You know it's going to jump into the greasy twilight of the crankcase with true death contempt. So you stuff it as good and as bad as possible with a cloth. If the lock falls, the cloth will stop it. And then Murphy comes into play. And the same thing happens that happened when Pavarotti was on the Dam. Just that one part where Pavarotti is not standing, there is a doif shit. And just that one hole that is not covered, the lock falls through.

Murphy can also work the other way around. Hardened by the merciless Murphy, you always assume the worst. I drove my for centuries Triumph Spitfire, knowing the engine was due for overhaul. It ran well, but made an expensive metallic noise. Until I accidentally saw that at certain speeds two metal plates crawled up against the throttle cable, to oscillate loudly again downwards. Pictures gone, and the Spitfire was like new. It's always the worst thing you can think of unless you assume that. Murphy can really make you happy. It's all that jam alone, isn't it? What a mess.