in ,

Exemption from MRB for transitional arrangement for old-timers and other inconvenience

A 1984'er. You can get away with that

I never thought about that. But if you make time for your vehicle administration, that is enlightening. I still lived under the happy assumption that classics older than 25 were still subject to the partial exemption scheme. But the rules for the transitional arrangement for old-timers are apparently different.


Have a look at the RDW site:

If your motor vehicle was first put into use at least 40 years ago, you will automatically receive an exemption for your old-timer. The date of 1st admission on your registration certificate is at least 40 years ago. If you do not automatically receive an exemption, you can request exemption using the Request motor vehicle tax exemption form. If you register a motor vehicle of 40 years or older in your name, you will automatically receive an exemption.

Was your motor vehicle put into use for the first time before 1 January 1988? And is the date of 1st admission less than 40 years ago? Then you may be able to use the transitional arrangement. Your motor vehicle is only eligible for the transitional arrangement if it concerns a: passenger car, camper van or delivery van that is only intended to run on petrol, motorcycle or truck that you do not use for business purposes, bus that you do not use for business purposes.

Caution!

Do you have a passenger car or delivery van that is not only intended to run on petrol? Then you are not eligible for the transitional arrangement. You pay full motor vehicle tax until your classic car is 40 years old.

Caution!

Do you have a camper on gas? Then you are eligible for the special rate for your camper. But instead of the special rate, you can also participate in the transitional arrangement for vintage cars. You request the transitional arrangement using the Request motor vehicle tax special rate for transitional arrangement for old-timers.

How important is that?

Of course, for us classic fans, that kind of rules and changes are actually of secondary importance. We do not drive classically to save a few euros and why shouldn't we classic lovers be robbed as well as that happens with so many other Dutch people?

Experience shows that there are very different things for us

For example, the current range of garage companies in the 'universal' sector is diminishing and a lot of technical knowledge about 'old cars and their technology' is being lost. A modern car mechanic is a wizard with his diagnosis equipment and profession a complete resetter of malfunctions. And that goes far. A mechanic came to the workshop manager: "I have already reset the fault three times, but he keeps coming back." The workshop manager asked: "Have you checked under the hood?" Not so.

Fortunately there are still enough garage owners and mechanics who still know their way around classic country, but these days they are 'specialists', men - and a single woman - who are not yet exposed and surprised when looking at a set of contact points.

In previous reports we already mentioned what you can do yourself with the help of nowadays good affordable garage tools, a workshop manual and YouTube. But be very careful when working on brakes and working under the car with the happily increasing trend in self-tinkering. Never work on a car that is jacked up. Always use 'Baby bridges', or axle supports. Or take a look around at a local DIY garage where you can use the bridge for a reasonable price. Neatly dispose of used liquids to the local environment.

And take a look around there too. When bringing some building rubble we found a complete neat set of magnesium rims for a Mini Cooper last year. We went to the nearby Sligro for a short while and there we scored a crate of beer that we exchanged for the wheel set. Those rims went on the Internet and so someone became very happy and we had proven that the purchase of a crate of beer can be a great investment. Cheers!


Please help us keep this website and the articles on offer free. Subscribe yourself Auto Motor Klassiek and also receive the magazine 12 times a year in the mail. Or donate a desired amount on our payment page via this link. We are certainly grateful for it.


Dear Classic Lover

Enjoy daily free stories about vintage cars in your email and sign up for free. 


A 1984'er. You can get away with that
Really holder-free
Even falls under different schemes

5 Comments

Give a reaction
  1. Hi, Wonder what rules exactly become. It is 5 to 12, but even with the inspector of the APK there is still a lack of clarity. Do you know more now? gr. Jake.

  2. It is too sad to say that we have such arrangements in this country that are hard to follow. This country is differentiating champion. It is too childish for words. With your old-timer you are therefore dependent on what the previous owner has decided? Totally ridiculous. It is time for us to throw 300.00 civil servants out of this country.

  3. I can also fine-tune contact points. And for the exact adjustment, just the painfully carefully cleaned feeler gauge in between. Even have the experience that I had to get some stuff for my Golf on a Saturday at the once local VW dealer. The manager asked if I could help a rushed-in customer with the assembly of a fresh set of dots because there was no technician available. Allez, hop with the goat. As a thank you and impressed by the accuracy and speed of my action, I got the things for free. Amazing, right? And the customer came back after the test drive with the announcement that her Golfje had never run as well as after 'this mechanic' had adjusted it.
    So,…. it was in the pocket. And I would do the same again afterwards with the adjustment of a diesel pump on yet another Wave. Simple enough, but they still had no knowledge of that in 1980 while the special tools were hanging on the plate !!
    What a time and what a wonderful memory.

Give an answer

The email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Citroën 2CV. The Belgian Ducks

Tools and keys. Because it's bad weather